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Mechanic Street, 080, Old Colony Railroad Station, 80 Mechanic Street, North Easton, MA, info, Easton Historical Society -

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posted by alias Historical Images on Sunday 10th of May 2020 08:52:39 AM

More information on this image is available at the Easton Historical Society in North Easton, MA www.flickr.com/photos/historicalimagesofeastonma/albums . The development by Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation of the factory and village land use in a rather organic manner with a mix work-related classes created an integrated geographic network. The housing on perimeter edge with factories and business affairs in the center creating the village concept in North Easton. Other important concepts were the Furnace Village Cemetery, Furnace Village Grammar School and the Furnace Village Store, which explains Furnace Village and other sections of Easton. source: Massachusetts Historical Commission, Easton Historical Society, Inc. In 1948 a few residents wishing to do something to preserve the history of Easton organized as the Easton Historical Society, Inc. The meetings were held in Frothingham Memorial Hall. After a very active period in the early 1950s, the Society was dormant until a small group of concerned people met in 1967 at the Ames Free Library. From that meeting, attended by less than twenty people, the Society's membership has increased to approximately 425 today. The principal stimulus in the late 1960s was receiving the North Easton Railroad Station from Mr. William A. Parker, Mr. John S. Ames, Jr., Mr. David Ames, and Senator Oliver F. Ames. To restore the station and establish it as a living headquarters and museum, members have spent many hours scraping, painting, replacing windows, landscaping, and numerous other tasks which have resulted in its being listed in the National Register of Historic Places. To raise funds for the heating system and the building supplies and services, flea markets, auctions, and other events have been conducted. In addition, antique auto meets, publication of historical materials, the reprinting of Chaffin's History of Easton, and the designing of the commemorative coin have occurred not only as revenue sources but also as services to the community. The very popular monthly newsletter has provided many residents of Easton and others throughout the country with information about the past and about on-going activities. In addition, the Society took a major role in the creation of the Local History program at Oliver Ames High School, which has received national recognition. Increased awareness and appreciation of Easton's historical past and present have reflected the success of many of the Society's endeavors. Presidents were from 1948- 1950 Mr. Daniel Buckley, 1951 - 1952 Mr. Amory Parker, 1953 - 1954 Mr. Roger McNamara, 1955 - 1956 Mrs. Graham Smith, 1957 - 1958 Mr. Willis Buck, 1967 - 1969 Mr. Edwin White, 1970 - 1971 Mrs. David Varella, 1972 - 1973 Mr. Duncan Oliver, and 1974 Mr. Gustav T. Winroth. Source: History of Easton, Massachusetts, Vol. II, M. McEntee, Easton Historical Society, ET AL, 1886-1974 A freight ticket from the former Old Colony & Newport Railway company, who was the successor to the Old Colony Line through Easton. The receipt was given to Abijah Tisdale for shipping 183 barrel hoops "more or less" as written on the paper, at a cost of $10.98. The receipt is dated August 21, 1872. Abijah lived on Mountain Road and making hoops was one of the many jobs he did on his farm. He traveled to North Easton to deliver his goods and have them sent on to a customer. He would have done business at the original railroad station in North Easton, which was a large wooden structure, barn-like in form, with a small office to handle passengers and freight. The hoops made by Abijah may have been sent either to Boston or Fall River, who were both connected by this line at the time. source: Easton Historical Society's Blog, Frank Meninno, Easton Historical Society, November, 2017 , Clover Club - Easton Historical Society The Society recently received from the Clover Club the Easton Throws, and now the Easton Tote Bags. Here is some information about the Clover Club that was written by Hazel Varella. The Society is proud to be chosen to carry on the Clover Club tradition of offering a scholarship to Easton students from the proceeds of the sales of the throws and the tote bags. Please read on: The Easton Historical Society assumed the tradition in 2016 that had been started in 1933 by the Clover Club of Easton of awarding a scholarship to an Oliver Ames High School graduate and the Club had continued the practice every year. In recent decades by selling Easton throws and tote bags, the Club had awarded at least two scholarships each year and sometimes three. Also four season pillows were designed for scholarship funding: spring –“Queset”; summer-“Unity Close”; fall-oldest house in Easton and winter-Langwater Pond. The Club’s final two scholarships were awarded in June 2016. Following these awards, the Club’s Scholarship Chair for the most recent two decades, Mrs. Howard Porter (Elizabeth), transferred the ownership of the throws and tote bags to the Society with the understanding that the Historical Society would use all the profits from these two items for Easton scholarships. Also, Mrs. Porter transferred the remaining Clover Club scholarship funds to the Historical Society. The Clover Club was one of the oldest women’s clubs in Massachusetts and was organized in 1891. In its early history the members resided in North Easton. Subsequently three other women’s clubs were organized in Easton also as neighborhood organizations: Browning Club, South Easton; Laurel Club, Eastondale, and Outlook Club, Furnace Village. The focus of each was its particular section of Easton. (The Outlook Club has partnered with the American Legion for a scholarship.) During the most recent half century improved transportation has played a vital role in the history of each. The history of the Clover Club documents more than 120 years of generations of women donating extensive time to community improvement. IT IS NOW THE CHALLENGE OF THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO CONTINUE THE PROUD TRADITION OF PROVIDING SEVERAL SCHOLARSHIPS EACH YEAR TO EASTON STUDENTS source: Easton Historical Society's Blog, Frank Meninno, Easton Historical Society, January, 2017 . We have as yet made no attempt to describe the town as it is today. For residents such description is needless; but for those who once lived here and have long been absent, and for Others who have not been here, an attempt at a description must be made, although the result will necessarily be inadequate. Carefully prepared maps of the town are given, showing the location and ownership of dwelling-houses and other buildings, as also the location of highways, streams, and ponds. In order to secure sufficient space for names, it was necessary to give the map of North Easton village on a separate sheet. The visitor who came to Easton a few years ago by cars and stopped at North Easton, received an unpleasant impression of the place at once by alighting in a dark and smoky station, and seeing only dismal waiting-rooms and surroundings singularly unattractive. He would now, however, in alighting find himself upon the platform of one of the most beautiful small railroad stations in the country. It is the generous gift to the Old Colony Railroad of Frederick Lothrop Ames; but the real intent of it is to beautify and benefit the village where it stands, and its giver has laid the whole community under obligations for his kindness. It is the work of the noted architect, the late H. H. Richardson; is built of Braggville granite, so-called, and brown sandstone, and has spacious and elaborately finished waiting rooms. A heliotype print of it is presented to the reader's attention ; it is a view taken from the southeast, and gives some idea, though an imperfect one, of the well laid-out grounds about the station. All the surroundings have been greatly improved. Concrete sidewalks are laid on Oliver Street, which is north of the station, and which has recently been widened and straightened. The large Hinge Factory of E. W. Gilmore and the long substantial stone shops of the Ames Shovel Works give a decided business aspect to this locality. A little way east of this building are the spacious grounds owned by Governor Oliver Ames and Frederick Lothrop Ames. These grounds are finely laid out. The large stone house at the left, not far from the entrance, is that of Governor Ames. source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 . It is the work of the noted architect, the late H. H. Richardson; is built of Braggville granite, so-called, and brown sandstone, and has spacious and elaborately finished waiting rooms. (In the author’s book, History of Easton, 1886) heliotype print of it is presented to the reader's attention; it is a view taken from the southeast, and gives some idea, though an imperfect one, of the well laid-out grounds about the station. All the surroundings have been greatly improved. Concrete sidewalks are laid on Oliver Street, which is north of the station, and which has recently been widened and straightened. The large Hinge Factory of E. W. Gilmore and the long substantial stone shops of the Ames Shovel Works give a decided business aspect to this locality. A little way east of this building are the spacious grounds owned by Governor Oliver Ames and Frederick Lothrop Ames. These grounds are finely laid out. The large stone house at the left, not far from the entrance, is that of Governor Ames. source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 , The first railroad connection with Boston enjoyed by Easton people was by the Boston and Providence Railroad, a stage-coach running from Easton to Canton, where the cars were taken. Subsequently, on the completion of the Stoughton Branch of the Boston and Providence line, the stages ran from Easton to Stoughton to make connection with the cars. Early in 1854 - Oliver Ames, Oakes Ames, Howard Lothrop, and their associates and successors - petitioned the Legislature for leave to incorporate a railroad company under the name of the Easton Branch Railroad Company. March 3, 1854, this petition was approved by the Governor; work was at once begun on the new road, and in less than a year it was completed, the first passenger train arriving at North Easton May 16, 1855. The next morning, when the train first started on its return, the rails spread and the engine got off the track. After it was again on the track, Green Hodsdon the conductor, who was much disinclined to come to North Easton at all, said to David Standish the engineer, - Get on to the engine David, and we leave this place to once! source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 , On May 16, 1855, the first passenger train arrived in Easton. The tracking from Stoughton to Easton was paid for by the Ames Shovel Company. This new line also enabled shovels to be sent to Stoughton where the trains connected with the Boston and Providence Railroad. content source; Massachusetts Historical Commission . A major addition to the scene is the railroad, which was constructed through the facility in 1864. The main line follows the east side of the property with spur servicing certain factory buildings for the delivery of raw materials and shipment of finished products. The spur forks off the trunk line at a yard north of Oliver Street. It passes close to the southeast corner of the Handle Shop and after crossing Oliver Street, splits into three legs that hug the east side of the Long Shop and the east and west sides of the Handle Storehouse. History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 In 1866, the Old Colony Railroad Company, which had previously run trains to Fall River and Newport only by the line through the Bridgewaters, built a new road, which passed through Stoughton, Easton, Taunton, etc., and has become the main line for the New York boat-express trains. The first passenger train to North Easton arrived September 24, 1866. This, of course, superseded the Easton Branch Railroad Company, although the connection with Stoughton by the old line is still maintained for convenience in transporting freight to connect with the Boston and Providence Railroad. source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 , In 1871, the map of North Easton Village clearly charts a waterway channeled under the Engine House and Handle Storehouse. A major addition to the scene is the railroad, which was constructed through the facility in 1864. The main line follows the east side of the property with a spur for multiple factory buildings for the delivery of raw materials and shipment of finished products. The spur forks off the trunk line at a yard north of Oliver Street. It passes close to the southeast corner of the Handle hop and after crossing Oliver Street, splits into three legs that hug the east side of the Long Shop and the east and west sides of the Handle Storehouse. content source; Massachusetts Historical Commission . History of Mechanic Street below The Ames Family & the North Easton Village below . Old Colony Railroad Station In 1881, the Old Colony Railroad Station, also known as the North Easton Railroad Station, at 80 Mechanic Street was commissioned by Frederick Lothrop Ames residing at – Langwater – at 135 Elm Street. In 1858, prior construction of the Old Colony Railroad Station, the map of North Easton Village shows the Easton Branch R. R. at 80 Mechanic Street as noted with the name, - Station. - The map shows the railroad track going past the station to just north of Pond Street and westerly out to Main Street proving freight service for – Ames Shovel Manufacturing. - The generous gift to the Old Colony Railroad of Frederick Lothrop Ames has been called one of the most beautiful small railroad stations in the country. In 1871, the map of North Easton Village shows the parcel at 80 Mechanic Street as noted with the name, - Depot - on the west side of the railroad track. In 1872, noted architect Henry Hobson Richardson (1836-1886) designed the Trinity Church in Boston with the building completed by 1877. The work on the church in Boston by Richardson drew the attention of the Ames family in Easton, some family has resided in Boston from time to time. Besides the Old Colony Railroad Station, Frederick Ames. a director of the Old Colony Railroad, had architect Henry Hobson Richardson (1836-1886), during the same year, design the Frederick Lothrop Ames Gate Lodge at 135 Elm Street in North Easton, Massachusetts. Noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) designed the landscaping plans for the Old Colony Railroad Station as Olmsted did with the other four Richardson’s buildings in North Easton. In 1884, Olmsted worked with Richardson to bring the grounds and roads in a blending manner with the surrounding business setting, most notably, the family’s company, the Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation and the family friend’s company, Edwin William Gilmore Hinge Factory. Richardson used some of the new, at the time, prairie style of design introduced by Frank Lloyd Wright, an architect, designer, writer, and educator, in the late 1880s. In 1886, the map of North Easton Village shows the parcel at 80 Mechanic Street as noted with the name, - Depot - with the footprint of the new station between the railroad track and Mechanic Street. The station’s specifications were printed in two trade publications, American Architect and Building News on February 26, 1887, and The Engineering Magazine in December of 1891. In 1895, the map of North Easton Village shows the parcel at 80 Mechanic Street as noted with the name, - Passenger Station. - Some of the specifications listed were a granite building, with brown-stone trimmings and tiled roof, 25 ft. X 90 ft., with a platform facing the track, and a heavy stone arched porte cochere on the rear of the building. The building is divided into a gentlemen's waiting-room and a ladies' waiting-room. A ticket-office is located between them on the side towards the track, and the waiting-rooms are connected back of the building. The third generation of Ames, children of Oliver Ames Jr., Frederick Lothrop Ames (1835-1893), and Helen Angier Ames (1836-1882), and sons of Oliver's brother, Oakes Ames, were Oakes Angier Ames (1829-1899) and Governor Oliver Ames, (1831-1895). The third generation of Ames in Easton brought together two noted designers, architect Henry Hobson Richardson (1836-1886) and landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), to design the Oakes Ames Memorial Hall at Three Barrows Street in the North Easton Village. The buildings included the Oliver Ames Free Library at 53 Main Street, the Oakes Ames Memorial Hall at Three Barrows Street, and the Rockery. In the same time era, Henry Hobson Richardson designed Frederick Lothrop Ames Gardner's Cottage at 137 Elm Street, Frederick Lothrop Ames Gate Lodge at 135 Elm Street, and the Old Colony Railroad Station at 80 Mechanic Street. The five buildings designed by Henry Hobson Richardson in North Easton Village represent close to ten per cent of all the Richardson buildings in the world. The Old Colony Railroad Station was the last of the Richardson’s buildings built in North Easton. The station has three parts including a ticket window opposite the front door as the middle part. Each end has train waiting room with a bathroom. The waiting room on the north has a spiral staircase to a room used by the train engineer. The engineer on the midnight train would sleep until time to stir the train from North Easton to Boston. In 1969, the Easton Historical Society found mattresses in the room following the donation of the railroad station to them by members of the Ames family. On September 5, 1958, commuter rail service came to an end at the Old Colony Railroad from Stoughton. In 1969, the Ames family purchased the Old Colony Railroad Station for fifteen thousand dollars from the Penn Central Railroad. Immediately, the Ames family gave the Old Colony Railroad Station to the Easton Historical Society at 80 Mechanic Street in North Easton. The Easton Historical Society uses the building for its headquarters, meeting place and museum. In November of 1969, a commemorative plaque placed at the station honoring family members purchasing building reads - Railroad Station; Designed by Henry Hobson Richardson for Frederick Lothrop Ames, 1881; Given to the Easton Historical Society by William A. Parker, John S. Ames Jr., David Ames, and Senator Oliver F. Ames; November, 1969. In 1972, the Old Colony Railroad Station was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. In 1987, the Old Colony Railroad Station became part of the H. H. Richardson Historic District of North Easton, a National Historic Landmark District. source: Easton Historical Society source; Massachusetts Historical Commission source: Ancestry source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 source: Easton’s Neighborhoods, Edmund C. Hands, 1995 source: Buildings and Landmarks of 19th-Century America: American Society Revealed, Elizabeth B. Greene, 2017 , The Ames Family & the North Easton Village One of the well-known Ames properties, Sheep Pasture estate, was owned by Oliver Ames (1864-1929), son of Frederick, (1835-1893), and Rebecca Caroline Blair Ames, (1838-1903), and Oliver's wife, Elise Alger West Ames, (1867-1945) Oliver was born on October 21, 1864. Oliver was a great-grandson of Oliver Ames, (1779-1863), whose father, John Ames, started making shovels just before 1774, older than the United States, in West Bridgewater. In 1803, Oliver came to Easton, purchasing a forge, a nail-making shop, a house and the Shovel Shop Dam with surrounding land on Pond Street. Oliver's siblings were Helen Anglier Ames Hooper, (1862-1907) who married her husband, Robert, and residing in Manchester, MA, Mary Shreve Ames Frothingham, (1867-1955), later at Wayside, Frederick Lothrop Ames, (1876-1921), later at Stone House Hill House and John Stanley Ames, (1878-1959) later at Langwater. Henry Shreve Ames died in infancy. Shortly after his graduation from Harvard University in 1886, Oliver joined the Oliver Ames & Sons Shovel Works, becoming a director of various business, railroad and trust companies. Oliver and Elise were married in Boston on December 3, 1890. Their children were Elise Ames Parker, (1892-1979), Olivia Ames Cabot, (1893-1978), Richard Colwell Ames, (1897-1935) and Oliver Ames, Jr., (1895-1918). Their older son, Oliver Ames, Jr., was killed in service to his Country in France during World War I. Oliver's father, Frederick Lothrop Ames became a member of the firm of Oliver Ames & Sons Shovel Works in 1863, and when it was incorporated in 1876 as Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation, became the Treasurer. After the passing of his father, Frederick Lothrop Ames, (1835-1893), Oliver became one of the trustees of his father's estate and following in the footsteps of his father, becoming Director and Treasurer of the Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation. From 1860 through 1930, the Ames Shovel and Tool Company at 28 Main Street owned buildings on the north side of Lincoln Street between Day Street and Reardon Way. These buildings provided housing for workers at the shovel shops, shoe shop workers, worker and domestic helpers for the Ames family and other factories in North Easton. The earliest tenement houses for employees were built close to the factories near ponds using the water resources. Example of housing were The Island and along Pond and Mechanic Streets, and south on Andrews Street and north to Oliver Street. The mixture was a combination of single- and multiple-family dwellings and boarding houses for unmarried workers. The elevated status in the social and economic factory hierarchy was shown by single dwellings which were inhabited by supervisory and skilled workers. Smaller housing units with two or more households were used by families of unskilled laborers. The houses had very basic accommodations, most houses were shared with strangers. The initial industrial development focused on improved ponds that provided motive power to the factory buildings. Eliphalet Leonard had a nail manufactory at The Island on the east side of Shovel Shop Pond and Asa Waters had a hoe factory on the south end of Hoe Shop Pond. In 1803, Oliver Ames came to Easton as this area around the Langwater Pond became the initial location for the shovel works. Later, Oliver Ames purchased the water privilege at the south end of Langwater Pond and expanded the water resource. By 1815, Oliver Ames and Asa Waters built a cotton mill on the current housing site of the Ames Shovel Works at 50 Main Street powered by canal dug from Hoe Shop Pond. In 1852, a devastating fire on The Island burnt down the wooden constructed shops which were replaced by the construction of the stone shops on the western side of the Shovel Shop Pond. The properties #55, #59, #63, #71 and #73 Lincoln Street were built for laborers similar in construction and style. Records show another four properties #45, #49. #85 and #89 Lincoln Street were moved from the shovel shop area. The parcels #41, #79 and 81 Lincoln Street were built on or moved onto properties on Lincoln Street. In 1815, the Easton Manufacturing Company, a cotton cloth factory, owned six-acre of land on the north side of Lincoln Street. In 1839, the Easton Manufacturing Company was dissolved which paved the way for David Macomber to purchase the six-acre parcel which he sold to Howard Lothrop. Later, Howard Lothrop sold the land to same parcel Oakes Ames (1804-1873), the son of company founder of the Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation, Oliver Ames Sr., (1779 -1863). In 1845, Oakes Ames, (1804-1873), transferred ownership of the parcel to his father, Oliver Ames Sr., (1779-1863) followed by Oliver Ames Sr., and deeded the parcel to Oliver Ames and Sons. In 1875, the six-acre property and other parcels of land were deeded to Frederick Lothrop Ames (1876-1921) and moving ownership back to Oliver Ames and Sons. In 1850, this area of Lincoln Street was woodland owned by the Ames family. In 1901, Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation transferred all of its real estate to the newly named Ames Shovel and Tool Company. The Ames family owned large parcels of land north, east and west of the factories. The Ames family built their residences in the middle of the work area on the west side of Main Street with two of those houses, Unity Close at 23 Main Street and Queset House at 51 Main Street near the shops. This was typical of factory village development in the period. During these times, owners and laborers interacted with each other in work and daily life where private locations were limited. The social status was shown in the size and styles of architecture, but they would be near or part of the work settings. The fancy iron fencing on the western side of Main Street was the only separation between the owner and employees. Later, the Ames family started create estates outside, but close to the North Easton Village. The estates featured large buildings called mansions, gardens, farm, other small buildings, passive conservation spaces, and recreational areas within their estates. In 1820, the Oakes Ames, Sr. owner of the O. Ames, began building worker testament housing for their workers. In 1820, the first two houses Oakes Ames, Sr. built were for the manager of his shop in Braintree. In 1832, Oakes Ames, Sr. built his second testament house for the workers in his shops in West Bridgewater. The house of Oliver Ames Jr., (1807-1877), was northeast of this area, facing Main Street. In 1886, historian William L. Chaffin, in his book, History of Easton, wrote that forty-five Roman Catholics, most from Ireland, lived in Easton in 1849, 150 by 1852, and 400 by 1860. In 1850, at least thirty-five of ninety-seven Irish-born males were working in Easton, or 36 percent, worked at the shovel shops. Seven were furnace workers at the Ames shops or iron forges. In 2002, historian Gregory J. Galer wrote in his book, Forging Ahead: The Ames Family of Easton, Massachusetts that by late 1820s, the shovel shop company, O. Ames found out that this area could not meet the need for labor at the shovel shops. By the 1840s, the workers who immigrated from Ireland helped to meet the need of labor. In 1836, Oakes Ames built a boardinghouse big enough for twenty workers. In 1845, Oliver Ames and Sons built twenty houses for their workers. By 1861, building and owning thirty houses and ninety houses for workers by 1884. From the historical area of Canton, Massachusetts called South Canton. In 1847, the Ames Shovel Shop began operating at 160 Bolivar Street in Canton, Massachusetts at a location between Bolivar and Forge Pond. In 1792, a corn mill was built followed by a cotton factory in 1812. In 1841, the Bolivar Mill burned to the ground. In 1845, the property was purchased by Lyman Kinsley for purposes of operating a iron forge followed by Oliver Ames and Sons taking over operations in 1848. In 1847, the land was used by Lucius Buck as a hammer shop to help in the expansion of the shovel shops in North Easton. In 1844, the expansion happens when Oakes and Oliver Ames, Jr., took over as operatives from their father Oliver Ames. In 1845, the Stoughton Branch Railroad allowed the Ames Shovel Shop to shipped stamped shovels for finishing from Canton to Easton. In 1852, a fire destroyed the Ames factory in North Easton and the shop in Canton was in heavy use until the factories were rebuilt with stone in 1853. In 1901, Oliver Ames and Sons Corporation transferred all of its real estate to Ames Shovel and Tool Company, a merger of the Ames company and several other shovel and handle companies. In June of 1930, as part of selling its tenement properties, Ames Shovel and Tool Company submitted and registered two sets of plans detailing lot boundaries for sixty-two properties including the twelve on Lincoln, Pond, Mechanic, Day, Barrows, Main, Canton, Elm, and Oliver Streets and Picker Lane off Canton Street. Ames Shovel and Tool Company contracted Samuel T. Freeman and Company, an auction handler, from Boston and Philadelphia, to auction forty-one of its properties in Easton. The auction list consisted of eighteen cottages, sixteen with two-family houses, three with four-family dwellings, two stores, and two building lots. In 1933, Ames Shovel and Tool transferred properties to John F. Neal, a lawyer from Malden for individual disposal of the properties to future owners. source: Easton Historical Society source; Massachusetts Historical Commission source: Ancestry source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886 source: Easton’s Neighborhoods, Edmund C. Hands, 1995 source: Forging Ahead: The Ames Family of Easton, Massachusetts, Gregory J. Galer, 2002 , Mechanic Street The neighborhood concentrated along Mechanic and Andrews Street comprises a neat enclave of small dwellings associated with North Easton’s factory workers. Nestled behind (north of) Main Street and backing up to shovel company holdings along Pond Street, the area was the location of mostly private development in the late 19th century. A certain amount of the land there was owned by boot maker William S. Andrews, whose house at 15A Mechanic was the only building depicted in the area on the 1855 village map. Neither street was platted in 1855, but by 1871 the private lane that connected the house with Main Street and, after bending around a hill behind the house, with Pond Street had been named Andrews Street. Ten more houses had appeared, including two Ames Company tenements at the Pond street end. Soon after 1871, Mechanic Street was extended from its southern terminus at Pond Street to Andrews Street, effectively bisecting what remained undeveloped on the west side of the ara. It appears that the Ames Company owned a significant portion of this section, and at least one building was moved here from the site of the new Unity Church on Main Street in 1875. source: Massachusetts Historical Commission Mechanic Street Mechanic Street and Andrews Street were voted in 1873, Jenny Lind Street in 1875, and extended in 1883. Pond Street in 1881, and Bridge Street in 1884. source: History of Easton, William L. Chaffin, 1886



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