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posted by Melinda Applegate alias Melbie Toast on Sunday 20th of July 2008 07:12:42 AM

Ahhhhh..... feels so good. Dolly loves to be scratched around her ears. BACKGROUND: Shooter “Whooter” and Dolly Wolly are our rescued and adopted retired racing greyhounds. We've had funny, whacky Dolly for since May 2007. We were warned that greyhounds are addictive, and of course we ended up adopting another: Shooter Whooter, whom we adopted in early January 2008. We adopted both Dolly and Shooter via the great folks at the Racing Home Greyhound Adoption organization in Phoenix, Arizona. Shooter is a gentle giant, a big tall male greyhound who, after we fattened and muscled him up with lots of love, food, attention, treats, walks and running is close to 95 lbs now. Shooter was about 5 and 1/2 years old when we adopted him, had raced 99 times at several tracks, and won 16 races. Unfortunately, after his successful racing career, Shooter ended up in an abusive home for several months where he was left outside and totally neglected. Happily, Jody Brown and the fine folks at Racing Home Greyhound Adoption rescued Shooter and brought back to health. Now we have him for life in his forever home. Shooter was quite shy and hesitant with us at first, but as the weeks passed he became more and more comfortable, confident and happy and it has been a joy to watch his personality blossom into the sweet, affectionate gentle giant he is now. Dolly Wolly is the “Princess” of our family….and she is so much fun. She is all muscle but only 68 lbs. and much shorter and smaller than big guy Shooter. Dolly has a little bit of a cross-eyed or cock-eyed look that is so cute; and she is kind of a crazy little girl, rambunctious, nutty, whacky... and so sweet and dear. Dolly is a couple of years younger than Shooter and didn't have such an illustrious racing career as Shooter did (Dolly never won a race!). But Dolly sure loves to run and play with Shooter in the park. Shooter is much faster than Dolly, but Dolly is much more agile and quick. Watching them run and play together is a joy to behold! We love them both so much, Dolly and Shooter are such wonderful dogs! I highly recommend adopting a retired racer for your own family next time you are looking for a wonderful new pet, for they make a great addition to the family! Racing Home Greyhound Adoption P.O. Box 43102 Phoenix, AZ 85080-3102 602-573-0940 Email: [email protected] www.racinghome.info NATIONAL GREYHOUND ADOPTION PROGRAM www.ngap.org/ 10901 Dutton Road - Philadelphia, PA 19154 Phone: (215) 331-7918 Fax: (215) 331-1947 MORE ABOUT THE GREYHOUND: The Greyhound is a breed of dog that has been primarily bred for companionship, coursing game and racing. A combination of long, powerful legs, deep chest and aerodynamic build allows it to reach speeds of up to 72 km/h (45 mph) in less than one and a half seconds, or within 3 strides. Greyhounds are one of the fastest animals on land, coming in second only to the cheetah. Male greyhounds are usually 71 to 76 cm (28 to 30 inches) tall at the withers and weigh around 27 to 40 kg (70 to 100 pounds). Females tend to be smaller with shoulder heights ranging from 68 to 71 cm (27 to 28 inches) and weights from less than 27 to 34 kg (60 to 75 pounds). You would think such large dogs would be difficult to care for, but this is not so. Although greyhounds are extremely fast and athletic, and despite their reputation as racing dogs, they are not high-energy dogs. They are sprinters, and although they love running, they do not require extensive exercise. Most are quiet, gentle animals. An adult greyhound will stay healthy and happy with a daily walk of as little as 20 to 30 minutes. Greyhounds are often referred to as "Forty-five mile per hour couch potatoes" or “Turbo-Spuds”. Greyhounds have very short hair and no undercoats and therefore are less likely to trigger people's dog allergies. Not having an undercoat, coupled with their lack of body fat, also means they are more susceptible to extreme temperature (heat and cold). It is recommend that Greyhounds be housed inside. The most common misconception concerning greyhounds is that they are hyperactive. In retired racing greyhounds it is usually the opposite. Greyhounds are intelligent and house broken easily. It is often believed that Greyhounds need a large living space, however, they can thrive in small spaces. Due to their temperament, Greyhounds make better "apartment dogs" then some of the smaller hyperactive breeds. The vast majority of greyhounds in the U.S. are bred for racing (registered with the National Greyhound Association or NGA), leading American Kennel Club registered dogs about 150:1. Each NGA dog is issued a Bertillon card, which measures 56 distinct identifying traits with the Bertillon number tattooed on the dog's ear to prove identity during their racing career. Not all dogs bred for racing are able to do so, due to speed, temperament, or physical problems. Most NGA greyhounds finish racing between two and five years of age. Some retired racing greyhounds have injuries that may follow them for the remainder of their lives, although the vast majority are healthy and can live long lives after their racing careers are over. Greyhounds are typically a healthy and long-lived breed, and hereditary illness is rare. Because the Greyhound's lean physique makes it ill-suited to sleeping on hard surfaces, owners of companion Greyhounds generally provide soft bedding; without bedding, Greyhounds are prone to develop painful skin sores. Greyhounds typically live 10–13 years. Due to the unique physiology and anatomy of greyhounds, a veterinarian who understands the issues relevant to the breed is generally needed when the dogs need treatment, particularly when anesthesia is required. Greyhounds cannot metabolize barbiturate-based anesthesia as other breeds can because they have lower amounts of oxidative enzymes in their livers. Greyhounds demonstrate unusual blood chemistry, which can be misread by veterinarians not familiar with the breed; this can result in an incorrect diagnosis. Sources: Wikipedia; Various PLEASE CONSIDER ADOPTING A RETIRED RACER, YOU WILL NOT REGRET IT :-)



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